Michael Rosfeld, an East Pittsburgh Police Officer, has been criminally charged with one account of homicide. The officer shot Antwon Rose, an unarmed black teenager, while he ran. According to the court records, Rosfeld turned himself in on Wednesday. 

The seventeen-year-old teen, an honors student and senior at Woodlands High School, had three bullets lodged in the arm, abdomen, and face. The bullet near his abdomen hit Rose’s heart and lungs, making it a fatal shot. 

A bystander, viewing from their house window, recorded the incident. Rose and Zaijuan Hester got out of a silver Chevy Cruze— a vehicle that matched a description of a car that conducted a drive-by-shooting that earlier. As the teens begin to run, shots begin to fire. In the video, the witness asked, “Why are they shooting them?”

Surveillance cameras showed a Chevy Cruze in a drive-by shooting, firing .40 caliber bullets. Later on, the casings of the bullets from the scene have been matched with the .40 caliber Glock under the back portion of the Chevy’s passenger seat. Despite the evidence identifying the bullets to the gun in the car, Detectives stated that the front passenger— where Rose sat— did not fire any shots. The victim from the drive-by shooting has been treated from a grazing gunshot wound to the abdomen. 

OFFICER ROSFELD WASN’T SURE IF HE SAW THE GUN

Rosfeld had been sworn into the department only hours before the shooting. After the incident, they placed him on administrative leave. In the affidavit, it shows Rosfeld being inconsistent with his stories. In the beginning, he believed he saw something dark that looked like a gun. After repeating his story, Rosfeld confessed that he did not see Rose with a gun. 

Later that night, Rose died at a nearby hospital. His funeral was on Monday. 

THE DEATH OF ANTWON ROSE LED TO PROTESTING

The incident had upset many people. Protesting began outside the Allegheny County Courthouse. People chanting “black lives matter” and other chants that demand justice gathered in Pittsburgh on Thursday. Leon Ford Jr., an activist who had been shot by a Pittsburgh police officer in 2012, commented, “This is painful for me. Because I fought for six years and I thought this wouldn’t happen again. I speak all over the country, and I talk about love, compassion, and understanding. But how do you have that right now?”